The Challenge of Massive Change

We live in the institutional remnants of a silo-ed industrial age. An age of the hero and individual leader, and yet we exist in an interconnected and interdependent world.

Change can no longer be the responsibility or the capability of a single actor, organisation, institution or domain. Change needs movements. Movements of actors both on the demand and supply side of innovation and intervention.

Change in this world cannot be designed as a strategy written for an organisation. Instead it needs the investment in growing shared intent, open missions, shared language, collective intelligence and action.

Unlocking the potential of the post industrial future of democratic change will involve recognising massive change in democracies can only happen with movement of massive multiple stakeholders and the institutional architecture which supports them.

This is a change model which requires us to reimagine leadership from being an organisational issue to one of building movements around shared purpose and mission.

This is a change model which requires us to reimagine governance from its corporate silos to one of systems.

This is a change model which requires us to unlock the interoperability of organisations as opposed to just driving their competitiveness for resources.

This is a change model which requires us to reimagine investment from being orientated around products and services, instead the accrued systems outcomes and viabilities.

This is a change model which requires us to re-account individual balance sheets and impact to the system balance sheets and its collective outcome.

This is a change model which requires us to re-imagine democratic accountability — from representational to one driven by the integrity of high frequency feedback.

This is a change model which requires us to not buy consultative intelligence but invest in growing the system’s collective intelligence.

This is a change model which needs to place empathy as the core architecture of the systems economy. Thereby reimagining our institutional norms from the employment contract, payee award mechanisms to KPIs.

Re-imagining change requires us to research, develop & retool the mechanisms of change. It is no longer sufficient to imagine change will be delivered solely through the acceleration of new products and services. We need to recast the fundamental architecture and medium of change. Recasting the #DarkMatter of our societies — the institutional infrastructure of our societies & economies. If we wish to truly deliver on the massive and complex challenges we face as societies.

This is a change model which requires not the ‘power of the I’ but the ‘Power of us’.

Indy Johar